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DIY for Elementary School

  Thank you buzzfeed for putting together this awesome list to help make the classroom a better place! Help students to identify lowercase and capital letters, match pairs of letters, and practice alphabetical order with this simple plastic spoon...

End of the Year!

  14 End of the Year Memes That Any Teacher Will Understand Here are some  of my favorites! To view the rest click here! 1.  It’s really great when you can actually see your teaching style in your students....

April is National Poetry Month

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Did you know that April is National Poetry month? We found some articles on the importance of poetry as well as how to teach/learn poetry in the Classroom.

 

10 Ways to Use Poetry in Your Classroom by Keith Schoch

Often when I mention poetry during a workshop, at least one teacher laments, “I would love to do more poetry with students, but there’s so much else to teach in my curriculum!” What I try to encourage (and I’m often helped big time by the workshop participants) is for this teacher to consider using poetry within her curriculum, as an integral part of her language, reading, and writing lessons, rather than as an add-on. In other words, I ask her to find a purpose for poetry.

Now, before you poetry purists flame me and cry out, “Poetry is in itself worth reading!” let me explain that I agree with you. I fondly recall organizing poetry picnics in third grade, where we would spread sheets and blankets on the field adjacent to the school playground and share favorite poems as we munched on morning snacks. So yes, I believe in poetry for its own sake.

But at the same time, I’m a realist. Many of us find it increasingly difficult to allocate the time to read poetry for its own sake; we would, in fact, like to discuss it beyond the month of April without needing an excuse or (shudder) a learning objective.

So increasingly it seems that while teachers can name lots of good reasons for using poetry with children at an early age, they still wonder how they can continue to integrate poetry in later grade levels. I offer a few suggestions below. And even if you can’t get through my ten reasons, do take the time to explore the recommended sites and resources appearing at the close of this post. I could in no way do justice to all the fantastic poetry books that are available, so I encourage you to share your favorite title in the comments section below.

Follow this link here to view the entire article!

1. Activate prior knowledge

2. Establish theme

3. Explore language

4. Focus on facts

5. Set a scene

6. Inspire writing

7. See new perspectives

8. Ignite curiosity

9. Provide pleasure

10. Capture character

Helpful sites:

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/calendar-activities/april-national-poetry-month-20478.html

http://www.poetryarchive.org/childrensarchive/poemsHome.do is a wonderful collection of poems selected just for children, and read by their creators.

Need help finding rhyming words? No worries! rhymebrain.com

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/10-ways-use-poetry-your-classroom

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